The Health Benefits of Dandelion

Where would someone hide the cure for disease if they wanted no one to ever find it? The best place would be right in front of you where you wouldn’t think to look. People mow over this “weed” every time they mow their lawn. Today we are going to talk about Dandelion.

Did you know a weed is simply a plant you don’t like? Dandelions grows abundantly and we spray tons of weed killers to get rid of them. All we are really doing is damaging ourselves and the environment by doing so. Imagine someone out there with liver disease spraying dandelion. The cure is right in front of them and they don’t even realize it. By the way Dandelions are perennial so you will be mowing and spraying them year after year.

Taraxacum Officinale aka Dandelion. Dandelion’s name comes from the french term (dent de lion) which means tooth of the lion. The plant is native to Europe and Asia. It dates back quite far as there have been recordings of its use by the Anglo Saxon tribes of Britain whom are from the fifth century and the Normans in the tenth century. It was also mentioned in the works of the Arabian physicians in the tenth and eleventh century.

Dandelion has been accepted worldwide as a liver tonic. The root is commonly used for the liver and gallbladder whereas the leaves are more so for the use of detoxing the kidneys and bladder.

The roots can incredibly grow as deep as 15 ft into the ground.

Dandelion has many uses. Here are some of them: Loss of appetite, upset stomach, gas, laxative, stimulates secretion of salivary and gastric juices, general digestive tonic, blood tonic, nutritive superfood, anemia, jaundice and other liver problems, skin beautifier, eczema, bruises, gallstones, joint pain, muscle aches, inflammation, kidney stones and diuretic.

Dandelion leaves are great in a salad, smoothie or juice. They are rich in numerous vitamins and minerals, which is why it is such a great blood tonic. Those vitamins and minerals are: Vitamins A, C, E, B-complex, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium Phosphorus, Potassium, Sodium, Zinc, Copper, Manganese and a very high vitamin K content at 535%.

If salads or juices aren’t your thing, dandelion can be used as a coffee replacement.

Everyone is aware of what dandelion is, making it an easy to forage herb. But wait just a second. There is another plant commonly called false dandelion. Before you go foraging make sure you learn the differences between the two so you don’t end up eating the wrong plant. I wasn’t searching for dandelion but I picked a wrong plant in my garden once. I swear I heard voices for the next two hours. O_o

Dandelion has shown to be effective in treating high cholesterol and even melanoma.

A study concluded that Dandelion reduced the extent of atherosclerosis by reducing oxidative stress and serum TC, TG, LDL-C and raising serum HDL-C. Dandelion is beneficial in preventing hypercholesterolemic atherosclerosis and reducing risk factors for coronary artery disease.

Another study showed that dandelion root extract specifically and effectively induces apoptosis in human melanoma cells without inducing toxicity in noncancerous cells.

Well, that’s it for this video. I hope this video helped and motivated you to add more Dandelion into your diet. Its pretty amazing to think that a plant we call a weed is actually medicine. Be sure to hit like on this video like your life depends on it, I upload new health videos often so be sure to subscribe to my channel if you’re new, and as always I’m Brandon Goji. I’ll see you in the next video. Bye! Stay motivated you urban survivors!

 

Sources

http://www.columbia.edu/itc/cerc/danoff-burg/invasion_bio/inv_spp_summ/Taraxum_officinale.htm

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19678785

http://www.columbia.edu/itc/cerc/danoff-burg/invasion_bio/inv_spp_summ/Taraxum_officinale.htm#Benefits

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21234313http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2820990/

The Health Benefits of Stinging Nettle

Stinging Nettle
(Urtica Dioica)

Transcript:

Do you have allergies, weak bones or bad kidneys? Then you’ll want to tune into this video. Today we are going to talk about Stinging Nettle.

Urtica dioica, aka common nettle or stinging nettle, is commonly found in the United States and is a popular herb in the world of herbalism. The origin reports online were actually kind of spotty since writers were mixing up different species of nettle. Nettle originates from all over the world including Europe,  Asia, northern Africa, and western North America. It even dates back to being used in medieval Europe.

Most people consider this herb a weed but to anyone that is health conscious, it is a jackpot to find when foraging. By the way a weed just means a plant that an individual doesn’t like. Your non edible flowers and pesticide filled lawns are weeds to me! I’m glad nettle stings back when you kill it!

“Breathe, Smerk”

Nettle has stinging hairs called trichomes that act like mini needles. These needles inject chemicals into the skin and cause an inflammatory response leaving a quite painful itchy rash. The rash is normally safe and is actually used to help relieve pain. Scientists suspect it does this by reducing inflammatory chemicals and interfering with the transmission of pain signals. Those chemicals are: acetylcholine, histamine, serotonin, moroidin, leukotrienes, and possibly more chemicals. It is odd to think that when you touch this plant it causes a histamine response but when you consume it, it acts as an antihistamine to reduce allergies.

Nettle is mainly known and used for its kidney and allergy support but it should be considered for the incredibly long lists of other benefits.

The health benefits of Stinging Nettle include: kidney diuretic and adrenal tonic to reduce water weight, bladder infections, kidney stones, stimulates the lymphatic system, enlarged prostate, asthma, antihistamine to reduce allergies, anti inflammatory, relieves pain and rheumatism, supports the musculoskeletal system, sciatica, increases bone density with the help of silica and other nutrients, nutrition superfood, anemia, nutritional deficiencies, improve the quality of hair and nails, multiple sclerosis, PMS, skin and hives, cardiovascular system, hemorrhage, influenza, gout, alzheimer’s, bronchitis, bursitis, gingivitis, laryngitis, tendinitis, and reduce dandruff.

Nature seems to have a way to help us adapt to stresses such as allergies by starting the season with nettle. If we start to consume nettle once it starts growing, it may be able to help reduce our response to seasonal allergies.

With how toxic our environment is in this day in age, it is very important that we incorporate kidney tonics into our regime to filter out acids and other toxins that contribute to chronic diseases. Nettle is a good herb for doing just that.

Surprisingly nettle is an adaptogen which means it helps your body increase its resistance to numerous forms of stress.

I once heard a story that people would feed their horses nettle before selling them because it increased their health from energy to the vibrance of hair. Once the horses were purchased and stopped eating nettle they would go back to being normal quality horses. Darn those salesmen!

As I mentioned before nettle is good for strengthening the bones and nourishing the body in general. It is used in some brands as a plant based multivitamin. Its also used in soups and for a good reason. Nettle contains vitamins and minerals and they are: Vitamins A, C, E, F, K, P,  B-Complex, Calcium, Copper, Iron, Magnesium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Potassium, Zinc, Boron, Silica, Chlorophyll, Iodine, Chromium, Sulfur, and even Protein.

There are different types of this plant that you can find. Root, Seed, and Leaf. All of which are beneficial. Experiment and see what works best for you or work with a professional health practitioner.

One study tested its effectiveness on enlarged prostates with patients receiving nettle or a placebo with positive results.

The article states: “As a whole, nettle is recommended to be used more in treatment of BPH patients, given its beneficial effects in reducing BPH patients symptoms and its safety in terms of its side effects.

Another study shows its effectiveness in inhibiting pathways related to allergic rhinitis.

The article states: “bioactives have been identified in nettle that contribute to the inhibition of pro-inflammatory pathways related to allergic rhinitis. These results provide for the first time, a mechanistic understanding of the role of nettle extracts in reducing allergic and other inflammatory responses in vitro.”

Check the description below this video for more information about this herb and where to get it. Have you tried Stinging Nettle? Leave a comment below to share with the community how it worked out for you, subscribe if you’re new and also hit like on this video like your life depends on it! If you have any questions, feel free to ask. As always I’m Brandon Goji, stay motivated you urban survivors! and I’ll see you in the next video.

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